It’s fair to say that we Liverpudlians have a very distinct accent. We are instantly recognisable to those in the know and people outside of Merseyside often find it difficult to understand our harsh way of speaking. Our accent has often been described as sing-song, which explains our popular musical heritage! Certain phrases and words we use when communicating to a fellow Scouser can be incomprehensible to outsiders, so we’ve put together a short guide to get you started.  

Scouse 

The nickname for the Liverpool accent is Scouse and our residents are often called Scousers. The word Scouse comes from a stew of the same name which was often eaten by poor sailors and the working-class population that lived down by the docks. Scouse is a hotpot, usually containing a meat like lamb or beef with vegetables, typically potatoes, carrots, and onions. It’s usually served with pickled beetroot or pickled red cabbage and crusty bread for dipping and mopping up the leftovers. It seems basic but done well it’s a truly delicious meal, excellent for warming you up on the many cold evenings we endure! 

Made Up 

Believe it or not, this has nothing to doing your face for a night on the town or telling porkies. Made up is a phrase meaning happy or delighted. For example, ‘I’m made up with my new shoes from Liverpool One’ or ‘I’m made up with the low rates offered by PREMIER SUITES aparthotels in Liverpool’! This one of the many scouse words used exclusively by born and bred Liverpudlians and hasn’t caught on elsewhere, we wonder why!

 'Sound' and 'Boss'

If something is good in Liverpool, from clothing to footie results, it’s boss or sound. Adopted mainly by the younger generation, something that’s boss never gets old or goes out of fashion. It’s just boss. The two phrases are used interchangeably as positive descriptions such as 'it was sound' meaning it was good. They’re sometimes used to answer questions of our wellbeing, such as 'I'm boss' in reply to 'How are you?'. If you’re familiar with the scouse mannerisms we can also use it sarcastically.

Alright Lid?

This is our unique and informal way of asking how someone is; another exclusively Liverpudlian phrase used in day to day life. It often doesn’t require a response, and if there is actually something wrong, you wouldn’t usually get into it in response to this question. Lid originates from the rhyming slang of ‘bin lid’ – meaning ‘our kid’, another unique phrase meaning an adult male. Other ways to refer to men include lad, la, lid, sconner, fella, kidda, auld fella, our kid, mate. This is getting confusing, we know!

Bevvie

Bevvie is another word for beer. If you were going to the pub, you’d be heading for a bevvie. Replacements for this include going for an ale, a few scoops, or a jar. If you wanted to purchase beer from an off-licence, you’d be going to the offie. If you wanted to smoke or borrow a cigarette, you’d ask for a ciggie. If a friend of yours began acting silly after a few too many bevvies, you’d call him a divvy. Sensing a trend here?

Got a cob on 

If you come across an annoyed scouser, they’ll probably tell you they’ve got a cob on. It’s usually used for a mild to medium annoyance or disappointment, not full-blown anger. For example, if someone has stepped on your new trainees (shoes), you’d get a cob on. If something is annoying you, you may decide to jib it (avoid or abandon it). Full-blown anger is characterised by being raging or pure raging. You may end up calling someone a meff, a beut or a blart if they continue to annoy you!


Funny scouse words come in many forms and this is the tip of the iceberg. The best way to understand the scouse accent is to come and visit to experience the gorgeous city and its friendly residents for yourself.  PREMIER SUITES luxury aparthotels in Liverpool offer an excellent central location, perfect for exploring the sights, shopping ‘til you drop and enjoying a bevvie with the locals. Contact our team today to enjoy our best available rates.

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